I.        Prepare

 

  1. Set a personal goal for the meeting.
  2. Collect and prepare materials and handouts.
  3. Develop and write down an agenda
  4. Be informed.

 

 

II.       Conduct

 

  1. Start on time
  2. Outline what you want to cover.
  3. Recognize visitors
  4. Follow your agenda
  5. Maintain order.

 

 

III.      Wrap Up

 

  1. Ask if you have forgotten anything
  2. Restate any decisions or plans made.
  3. Make sure anyone who has taken a job or responsibility knows what it is.

 

 

General Rules & Guidelines for Effective Meetings

  1. Limit or eliminate drinking.
  2. Never allow a meeting to last over 1 ½ hours.
  3. Ask for ideas, then offer yours.
  4. Use “Robert’s Rules of Order” or some modified version, whatever you and others are comfortable with.
  5. In forming an agenda try to stay with a logical progression such as. past, present, or future
  6. Have someone take notes (Secretary).
  7. Start your meeting by reading the minutes from last meeting.
  8. When a controversial subject comes up, take time to assure everyone that they will have their turn to speak, one at a time.
  9. Let everyone express their opinions twice If there are no changes and you see no middle ground or compromise then move on.
  10. If you cannot answer a question. write it down and follow up on it after the meeting

 

Twenty-two Deadly Sins

  1. Appearing unprepared.
  2. Starting late.
  3. Handling questions improperly.
  4. Apologizing for yourself or the organization.
  5. Being unfamiliar with knowable information.
  6. Using audio visuals unprofessionally.
  7. Seeming to be off schedule.
  8. Not involving participants.
  9. Not establishing personal rapport.
  10. Ending late.
  11. Appearing disorganized.
  12. Not establishing a positive image.
  13. Not covering the promised objective.
  14. Not scheduling and honoring breaks.
  15. Practicing bad habits.
  16. Not checking environment.
  17. Not updating material.
  18. Not admitting mistakes.
  19. Using inappropriate humor.
  20. Using inappropriate language.
  21. Coming on as an expert, a know it all.
  22. Using poor grammar, pronunciation and enunciation.

 

THE NUMBER ONE RULE

 

The District/Chapter Director, or even a committee chairman, should be prepared to run the meeting.

 

  1. Have an agenda!
  2. Know in advance what to expect from committee reports, and be sure those giving the reports are well prepared.
  3. Be sure the meeting place is adequate.

ORDER OF BUSINESS

Below is a sample of an agenda that can be used for meetings:

  1. Call to order
  2. Introductions of special guests
  3. Reading and approval of previous meeting minutes.
  4. Reports of committees
  5. Old business
  6. New business
  7. Special orders*
  8. Announcements
  9. Adjournment

  * Special orders are important business items which the group has previously agreed to take up at this specific time.

 

CONDUCTING THE MEETING

 

Start the meeting on time!         If the meeting is suppose to start at 8:00pm, start it at 8:00pm!

 

SPEAKING

 

                To speak at a meeting, the person who wishes to speak should be recognized by the chairman of the meeting, rise and address the chairman. On issues or motions on the floor, (1) the maker of the motion is always first to speak in order that he may explain the motion, (2) no one gets a second chance to speak until everyone has had a chance to speak once, and (3) the chairman should try to alternate speakers between both sides of an issue.

                Speaking is not usually in order until the presiding officer has indicated who is entitled to speak; follows the making of a motion; is limited - - to give everyone an opportunity. Use Robert’s Rules of Order as Revised for your guide.

 

THE MOTION

 

The motion is the means whereby the group takes action. It is a statement of what is to be done and how it will be accomplished. It should be carefully worded to prevent misunderstandings.

                The motion is made by stating, "Mr. Chairman, I move that....... .........................." The chair does not have to recognize a motion that begins, "I motion............................"

                Depending on the type of motion that's being stated, it usually requires a second. This means the seconding party believes the motion is important enough to be discussed by the members. The seconding party simply states, "I second the motion." He may do so without rising.

                Parliamentary law is designed to insure that the group considers only the motion on the floor, and only one motion at a time. It also allows or assists the chairman in maintaining order and to help get through business quickly and orderly.

                Confusion in the meeting will not occur if the presiding officer understands the basis of parliamentary law and always keeps the group well informed on what is happening on the floor, and what will happen next.

 

MOTION AMENDMENTS

  

Amendments are not always necessary, but if someone wishes to change a motion, yet not totally do away with it, he/she may move the adoption of an amendment. This can be done at any time during the discussion on a motion.

                A member, after being recognized by the chair, states, "I move we amend the motion to....,........................." The amendment is seconded.

    EXAMPLE:

"Mr. Chairman, I move that the Falmouth Chapter hold its next regular membership meeting on the second Tuesday of the month at 7:30pm. "

"Mr. Chairman, I second the motion."

(discussion of the main motion)

"Mr. Chairman, I move we amend the motion to change the time to 8: 00pm. "

"Mr. Chairman, I second the amendment."

(discussion on the amendment only follows; then voting on the amendment only; if the amendment 

passes then the presiding officer must inform the group that they are now discussing the MAIN motion as amended; this is followed by a vote on the main motion as amended)

 

The chair must state whether the motion passed or failed.

 

 

USING THE LAW

               

As stated earlier, parliamentary law is vital to orderly and successfully conduct of meetings. You don't have to be a whiz in the use of the law, but a general knowledge will be very helpful. It would be helpful if the district/chapter had a copy of Robert’s Rules of Order to refer to should the presiding officer find it difficult to deal with a piece of business.

 

TO PRESENT AND DISPOSE OF A MOTION:

 

  1. Member rises and addresses the chair
  2. Member receives recognition by chair
  3. Member proposes a motion
  4. Another member seconds the motion
  5. Group discusses the motion
  6. Chair calls for a vote on the motion
  7. Chair announces results of vote

 

This simple procedure can alone make your meetings run smoother.

 

PURPOSE OF MOTIONS

 

 

  1. Main Motion - - brings question before the group for their consideration.
  2. Subsidiary Motion - - for the purpose of modifying or the disposing of the main motion under discussion.
  3. Privileged Motions - - have no connection with the main motion but are of importance to demand consideration.
  4. Incidental Motions- - miscellaneous motions which cannot be placed in any of the groups listed above.

 

 

RANK OF MOTIONS

 

                Below is a chart, in order of importance, for you to follow. You will note that a main motion cannot be preceded by any other. Also, two main motions cannot be on the floor at the same time. An incidental motion has no order of precedence among themselves, and anyone of them may be proposed when a situation arises that requires it.

                On the following page(s) you will find a chart to use that shows you the various motions and how they are to be handled. This guide may be used if your chapter does not have a Robert’s Rules of Order guide, or can be used until such time that you purchase one. This guide is a basic Robert’s Rules of Order guide, and is legal to use in any of your meetings.

                We should caution you to use this guide only as needed to help you in your meetings, Many members, who are not use to having to be recognized to speak or use to using any part of parliamentary law are apt to be uncomfortable with it. We recommend if you have never used the law, or used it sparingly in the past, that you let your members know that you are going to start using it and why. Be patient! The members will soon learn that the law and can be fun to use. They will eventually see that it is helpful to have quicker, more efficient meetings.

                Lastly, parliamentary law is used for district/chapter records. That is, your district/chapter meeting minutes are a permanent record of history of what the chapter has done. You can refer back, and you will, to the past minutes to see exactly what was done by a particular motion. It is also a record of what the membership instructed you or the chapter to do, and if there is ever any confusion, you can simply refer back to the past meeting minutes.

   Enjoy!!!!!

 

HOW TO AVOID MUDDLED MEETINGS

or

A GUIDE TO PARLIAMENTARY LAW         

 (Robert’s Rules of Order as Revised)


 

CHART OF MOTIONS (codes)

 

INSP = may interrupt a speaker

NSR = no second required

ND = not debatable

LD = limited debate

OMQ = opens main motion to debate

2/3 = requires a 2/3 vote, according to standard parliamentary law, to pass or adopt

 

 

Privileged Motions

 

To fix time at which to adjourn the meeting....................……………………….LD

To adjourn (unqualified)….……………… LD

To take a recess……………………………LD

To rise to a question of privilege……..…. INSP

                                                            NSR

ND

To call for the orders of the day………….. INSP

                                                           NSR

                                                            ND

 

Subsidiary Motions

 

 

To lay on the table……………………….. ND

To call for the previous question.……….…ND

                                                                                2/3

To limit or extend limits of debate……...... LD                                                           

2/3

To postpone definitely……………………… LD

To refer to a committee............................…LD

To amend…………………………………… LD

To postpone indefinitely…………………OMQ

 

 

 

 

 

Main Motions

(general & specific)

 

To take from the table………………………ND

To reconsider…………….………………..INSP

                                                           OMQ

To reconsider and have entered into the minutes.......……………………………..INSP

                                                            OMQ

To rescind.………………………………OMQ

                                                        2/3

To adjourn(qualified)……………………..…ND

2/3

To expunge………………………………OMQ

2/3

To adopt resolution or amend……………….2/3

 

 

Incidental Motions

 

To suspend the rules……………………..…ND

2/3

To withdraw a motion……………………NSR

ND

To read papers(letters, etc.)…………………ND

To object to consideration…………………INSP

                                                            NSR                                                             

ND                                                        

2/3

To rise to a point of order…………………INSP

NSR

                                                             ND

To rise to a parliamentary inquiry………INSP           

ND

To appeal from the decision of the chair.....INSP                                                            

LD

To call for a division of the assembly...….NSR

                                                             INSP

                                                             LD

To call for a division of a question.………....ND

 

Effective Meetings